Thursday, April 10, 2014

Dying to Be Heard: Facts You Should Know About Mesothelioma and Asbestos Exposure

This is Heather and Her Family
This is the Website: http://www.mesothelioma.com/heather/awareness/#.U0apU_ldVSA

Did you know the beginning of April held Asbestos Awareness Week?  If not, you're not alone, neither did I until Heather Von St. James contacted me to let me know.  Just three months after the birth of her first and only child, Heather was diagnosed at age 36 with mesothelioma.  She was given 15 months to live unless she opted for surgery to have a lung removed.  Eight years later, she is still here to tell the tale, and now she wants to help spread the word to you.  According to Heather (who lived it first hand and should know), asbestos, the only known cause of mesothelioma, is not banned in the US. She was exposed to it via a jacket her father brought home from work, and diagnosed 30 years later. Her passion to get the word out, and expand our knowledge on the dangers of asbestos exposure is a good one, and her website is put together extraordinarily well.

You can find out more by visiting the site here: http://www.mesothelioma.com/heather/awareness

You can also follow her on Facebook, Twitter, and/or G+

Heather is one of the lucky ones. Most people who are diagnosed with mesothelioma don't live to tell the story.  Big kudos to Heather for helping to spread the word on a cause all of us could stand to learn more about.  Awareness is great step towards positive action.

38 comments:

  1. You'd think they'd get on that and ban it everywhere

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  2. That stuff used to be everywhere. They have banned it in a lot of places. So happy to hear Heather lived to tell her story.

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  3. I always see attorneys advertising law suits for people who were diagnosed with mesothelioma, but I Never actually knew what it was.

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  4. I've posted before about her to. It must be a very hard thing to go through for sure!

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  5. I remember reading about this on Allissa's site. I am glad to hear that Heather is one of the lucky ones!

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  6. Thanks for sharing this important information. I'm glad that we have figured out the dangers of asbestos and are working towards getting rid of it all!

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  7. I was just reading about a woman who sold her house to the government and then after that, it was found out that it had asbestos all over it.

    This is very serious!

    I'm so glad she is here to tell her story first hand and share information.

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  8. God bless Heather for her courage and her survival. The first I had heard of mesothelioma was when Steve McQueen died. It took over 30 years to make this asbestos effects known.

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  9. Scary stuff. I love how Heather is getting the word out.

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  10. I will have to go check it out - a jacket?

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  11. Sad and bad. And asbestos removal is an ongoing drama over here too. Home renovations are a danger zone, because it was so commonly used here. For years and years and years.

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  12. Asbestos is so dangerous and many people don't take the danger seriously. It's great that Heather is spreading the word about it!

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  13. a jacket?
    i hate to imagine how much and where it is at
    around here...

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  14. Asbestos is scary 8 years ago I bought a house and when the inspector checked it out they found asbestos in the attic. Thanks goodness I was able to get out of the sale. Asbestos exposure is scary.

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  15. My grandparents had an old home that they wanted to tear down. They had to pay $1500 for an asbestos inspection before they could tear it down. Luckily they didn't have any asbestos but too bad it cost them $1500.

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  16. Thanks for sharing more awareness about it. Such a dangerous substance definitely should be banned!

    Ai @ Sakura Haruka

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  17. It's a blessing that Heather lived to tell her story. Thank you for sharing her story with us.

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  18. I found out about asbestos when I was working at a company that deals water/fire and other type of disasters. It's really is a scary thing. Now that I know about it when we look for homes we always check the date for when it was build.

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  19. So glad Heather lived to tell her story. Thanks for sharing this, Rosey!
    Happy Friday!

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  20. Our apartments are known for having asbestos, so it's quite scary. My husband is certified and trained in asbestos, so he knows a lot about it.

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  21. Our apartments are known for having asbestos, so it's quite scary. My husband is certified and trained in asbestos, so he knows a lot about it.

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  22. I can remember working in a building that had it and that they cleared us out without explanation. It was found out through the grapevine. They kept it quiet to prevent lawsuits. What a horrible thing she went through and good for her in using it to raise awareness.

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  23. That is horrible. I don't know what I would have done. I'm glad she is using her story for the greater good! Thank you for sharing!

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  24. People who buy older houses need to be on the lookout for this. It pops up in some strange places.

    slehan at juno dot com

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  25. Wow, I can't believe that kind of exposure can be so dangerous. This is totally scary stuff!

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  26. So glad she is here to tell her story. I remember them removing it from my high school when I was a teenager. So scary.

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  27. What a great post! Thanks for sharing!

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  28. I am leasing an old Victorian cottage built in 1905 and I do worry about asbestos. I know for sure the home next door has it, and they were built around the same time. Thanks for bringing some awareness through your post

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  29. Did you say a jacket her father brought home from work? Dear Lord, that's an attempt at murder. Think about all the people who got to wear a similar jackets... What idiot would put asbestos in a jacket? I'm speechless.

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    1. My dad worked with products containing asbestos, such as drywall mud and spackling... He used to sand the stuff when the tapers finished.. He also did demolition in buildings that contained asbestos, his jacket was covered in the dust from those jobs, not made of it.. Although, there was asbestos fabrics used in theater curtains and the like... It wa everywhere.

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  30. They still use it in brake pads for cars. It really should be banned.

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  31. This is such important information. I know a lot of the first responders on 9/11 were affected by this.

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  32. It is always great to hear the happy stories of survivors. Thank-you for helping to spread the word.

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  33. Hi Rosie - so good that you're promoting the dangers of asbestos .. we have strict rules and regulations over here - we can't use it, and it needs to be removed under very tight controls. I'm just so glad Heather survived .. she looks a feisty lady .. and I'm glad she was lucky to look so healthy and pull through .. cheers Hilary

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  34. I never knew about this - very important - thanks for sharing.

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  35. Seems some people are more susceptible to the effects of asbestos, but what a good lesson about taking your health in your own hands.

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  36. Asbestos is something that really needs to be stopped completely. In case you didn't know, formaldehyde in trailer homes can be toxic also. They are full of it and a new one even comes with a warning posted on the wall about the effects it can have. People with unhealthy immune systems are even more susceptible than those that are healthy but EVERYONE is at risks. That's something that needs to be stopped too!

    Thank you for sharing Heather's story!

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  37. It is very dangerous. WE all need to be aware of this. Thanks AMber N

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